YB Turmeric 10-in-1 tea 'invades' Japan

Published: June 12, 2018 11:31am | Japan


Home-grown Yamang Bukid Healthy Products, Inc. “invaded” Japan with its export-quality healthy food products last year, a big stride by a Filipino company that was initiated a little over seven years ago.
YBHPI’s product launch in Japan burst off with a big bang as Filipino women wearing Filipinia apparel wowed the passersby at a park, drawing them into the event.
Curious strollers took slurps of YBHPI’s signature product the Turmeric 10-in-1 Tea served to them through free-taste sales approach. Thumbs-ups flashed after each gulp.
YBHPI’s Japan launch soared even higher by the unexpected endorsement of celebrity Doctor Joel Mendez, who chanced upon a YB store, grabbed a jar of the Turmeric 10-in-1 Tea and made a sales pitch: “Hi, ako po si Doctor Mendez. At ito po ay turmeric tea galling sa Yamanb Bukid. Ito po ay inyong tikman, galing Pilipinas. Isang magandang inumin para sa inyo.”

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DA training exec advocates setting up of more farm schools

  • PUERTO PRINCESA CITY—The head of Department of Agriculture’s training arm in Mimaropa (Mindoro, Marinduque, Romblon, Palawan) region has encouraged farmers to help in the government’s thrust to teach more people to become farmers themselves by setting up learning sites and farm schools.

    Pat Andrew Barrientos, center director of the Agriculture Training Institute (ATI) in the region said there is a huge need of farming institutions nationwide even as the government is allocating over P700 million yearly to fund these.

    (Photo by JM Zap)

    “We are targeting around at least three farm schools or learning sites per municipality. (But) nationwide, we only have about 30 farm schools or learning sites, so it’s really inadequate,” Barrientos said during the sidelines of a regional summit of farm schools and learning sites for agriculture in Mimaropa held at Yamang Bukid Farm in Barangay Bacungan here.

    Barrientos said a huge fund that should have benefitted the farmers would be reverted to government coffers if there would be not enough farm schools established.

    (Photo by JM Zap)

    “That’s why we are encouraging our farmers to join us in our program. We will guide them, teach them. Make their children engage in agriculture and realize there is money in agriculture right now,” the ATI regional chief said.

    He said participation of the private sector is vital to the success of the program as the agency lacks manpower.

    (Photo by JM Zap)

    “Our requirements are not that stringent so farmers can easily comply with them. Just submit a letter of intent, attend trainings given by DA-ATI and that you must own at least a hectare of property we can use as demo farm,” said Barrientos.

    Barrientos cited as example the case of Yamang Bukid Farm, a 20-plus hectare farm tourism destination site which now fast becoming a place of learning for farming.

    (Photo by JM Zap)

    “Yamang Bukid is a private entity that trained at ATI. It saw the program about becoming a learning site and applied to become an accredited and certified one,” he said.

    In pointing out the viability of a farm becoming a farm school or learning site, Barrientos said a farmer who operates a farm school or learning site can earn up to P140,000 per batch of up to 25 student-scholars per month.

    “When you become a farm school, what’s good is that you teach people, you help the community and you also make money. It’s a win-win situation,” he added.

    (Photo by JM Zap)

    He assured the would be farm schools to not worry about where and how to get student-scholars because the government has also provided incentives to those who want to learn in these farm schools and learning sites.

    Barrientos said the government’s Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (Tesda) is giving allowances to student-scholars in ATI-accredited farm schools.

    Upon completion of these courses, graduates are given national competency certifications which they can use when they seek farming jobs locally or abroad, he said.

    “We are instilling a sense of pride to our farmers who earn NC II certificates even if they do not have a college diploma,” the ATI official said.

    (Photo by JM Zap)

    Barrientos called on farmers to take advantage government programs meant to help uplift their lives.

    “All we have to do is to guide them, and the farmers should be guided accordingly. They should have the commitment, willingness, and dedication to learn and see the benefit of the program,” he added.

    (Juan Lim)
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Banaba: Nature’s Best Anti-Diabetic Remedy

  • The next time you see banaba grown near your backyard, thank your forebears for it. Known in English as queen crepe myrtle, or pride of India and banaba in Filipino, Lagerstroemia speciosa is a small to medium-sized tree of up to 20 meters tall and with smooth, flaky bark.

    While it is grown and present in most areas of the world, cultivation of banaba has been prevalent in South and Southeast Asia, particularly in India and the Philippines where the plant, particularly its oval-shaped leaves are harvested for traditional medicinal uses. Before it was even introduced to the West and given a scientific name by Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus, the plant now known as banaba has been used for centuries by Filipinos and other Asian as traditional medication for diabetes-like illness. Its scholarly and scientific studies came and were published only as recent as 1940, according to Miura and Takagi (2012).

    The two Japanese experts, in a paper published by the United States National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) reported a clinic study on the effects of banaba to humans with mild type 2 diabetes. The study revealed a significant 13.5% decrease in blood sugar levels and no side effects, negative or otherwise, were reported.

    A biomedical research by South Korean doctors Cheolin Park and Jae-Sik Lee on the other hand pointed to a component in banaba leaves extract called corosolic acid that acts as an anti-hypoglycaemic (blood glucose reducer) agent. Their study, published in 2011, asserted that coroslic acid helps improve the distribution of glucose to the cells of the body, thereby regulating blood sugar. The two South Koreans also supported banaba extract’s short and long-term use against diabetes and its safety against adverse side effects.

    With the plant extract’s mechanisms and functions, banaba remains among nature’s best antidiabetic remedy for prevention and treatment without the adverse side effects shown in current prescribed drugs.

    Therefore, they said, banaba could be a promising candidate for future antidiabetic drug as an ingredient or as a main component or base.
    Aside from its antidiabetic properties, studies also show banaba as a good antioxidant. It has compounds that help regulate and increase antioxidant compounds in the body, helping cells and tissues resistant to and fight off infections and diseases.

    You can conveniently avail of banaba’s antidiabetic properties and other health and wellness benefits by just a cup of Yamang Bukid Healthy Products Inc.’s Turmeric 10-in-1 Tea. Scientifically formulated to accurately extract nature’s antidiabetic plant, Yamang Bukid Turmeric 10-in-1 Tea is also mixed with turmeric and eight other powerful herbs to give you a spicy morning beverage with nature’s dose of health and wellness.
    (JL)
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Little girl with hole in heart gets care from Yamang Bukid

  • From their hometown in Mabinay, a farming town in Negros Oriental, the family of Joanna Balansag flew her to Quezon City for the routine tests at a hospital. But her examinations are not the usual types where one can go home hours after being under the glare of the doctor’s instruments. At five years old, the frail body of Joanna, a timid little girl with languid eyes that would have used to be sparkling, has been under stressful laboratory exams that must be unsettling to her due to the presence of strangers and menacing syringes and other hospital contraptions.

    “I feel pity of her because she’s so young to endure all this,” Junrel Balansag, a 30-year old truck driver, said of his daughter. He was talking in a mix of Cebuano and Tagalog. Balansag and partner Josephine, 33, brought the baby girl to the Quezon City office of turmeric tea manufacturer Yamang Bukid Healthy Products Inc.

    Joanna sheepishly smiled at the strangers—actually Yamang Bukid employees who warmly welcomed her and her family with smiles of their own and “Hello baby!” coos. Inside the firm’s offices, she was more relaxed and at ease, even lounging on a seat in front a desktop computer showing some Youtube videos. “She loves to eat chicken,” a Yamang Bukid employee who has assisted the family said, referring to a popular chicken fast food brand. The Baguio City-based company, known for its charity works as its wellness products shouldered the costs of bringing the girl from her village to her operation and eventual rehabilitation and healing.

    Josephine said Joanna, the second of their five children, did not show any signs or symptoms that something was amiss in her. “When she was five, her preschool teacher noticed Joanna ate little, was too weak to enjoy outdoor games with children her age. She looked and moved very frail,” Josephine said. The girl was coughing heavily that they thought she was having a bout of asthma. Then it was decided she undergo laboratory examinations. There, doctors found a disturbing and frightening discovery—the little girl’s heart has a hole.

    Josephine said they were shattered upon hearing the doctor’s findings. Their parental instinct put to the test, they scrambled to look for ways to find money to pay for the girl’s medical needs. “We have nothing, We’re just a poor family,” said Junrel. “Where will we find the money?” So they asked around for help. But whatever amount their friends, relatives and neighbors could scrimp were not enough. And the time for the child to go under the knife was ticking fast. The family had to act swiftly.

    With the help of some young friends, the family took to Facebook to ask for help. They created an account under Joanna’s name, posting her pictures and pleading for support. Slowly, their cause snowballed and the little girl’s plight became known to more and more people. It reached to the owners and officers of Yamang Bukid Healthy Products Inc. who then arranged to have the family flown to Manila for Joanna’s eventual treatment. The company and its employees shouldered the family’s board and lodging, food and other expenses while staying at the capital. It also assisted in ensuring Joanna would get the necessary tests before she could be operated on.

    “I was moved by the little girl’s dire condition,” a company official, who refused to be identified, said while holding back tears. He said he could relate with what the family was going through because he also had the same experience when a child relative of his also had the condition like that of Joanna’s. Company officials vowed to help the little girl so she could endure the operation and ultimately live, just like the child-relative of the firm official. On Wednesday, July 10, Joanna was taken to the Philippine Heart Center for the routine check-up. Accompanying her and her parents were Aileen Baugbog, YBHPI’s human resources assistant and Dianne Kathryn Datu, the company’s communications and social media content creator.

    The little girl who is a fan of shows of comedian Willie Revillame, loves to eat colored candies, likes the color pink and always smiles whenever she’s in front of a camera, was to be admitted at the PHC for several days as she undergoes cardiac catheterisation—a procedure in which a hollow tube is inserted into a blood vessel to determine how well her heart is working. That is, however, a long way before her operation to fix her heart could ever begin. “We’re very thankful to Yamang Bukid for helping Joanna. We pray she would get well,” Josephine said.
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