Baby Ali, 11-month old with heart disease pleads for help, prayers

Published: August 18, 2019 09:15am | Philippines


He just turned a month shy of his first birthday last Aug. 16. But there are no celebratory cakes and candles just as yet.
For infants his age, it might have been a happy celebration, with friends and relatives coming over to give him and his delighted family well wishes. But Baby Zayn Maquiel Pagcaliwangan is not your normal child. He hasn’t been like that since being born nearly a year ago.

You see, the infant has practically lived all his life inside the confines of a hospital. The infant, whose family hails from Barangay Poblacion, Aborlan town in Palawan, was born with congenital heart defects.
Baby Zayn has DORV (double outlet right ventricle) in which the arteries that connect the heart to the lungs are reversed from their normal position, VSD (ventricular septal defect) or hole in the heart and PDA (patent ductus arteriosus), or an opening in the heart of a human fetus that did not close even after the baby was born.

The infant’s dire condition has sent him to the hospitals several times and in long durations each. According to his mother, 20-year old Pollyn, Baby Ali—as Zayn Maquiel is dotingly called by those who love him——was so gravely ill that his vital signs monitor went to a flat line several times.

His medical condition has cost the family so much, with hospital bills running to over P2 million. The infant’s medical emergency has drained his family’s finances, prompting relatives and friends to shell out money and help.

In between, Baby Ali’s condition swung from bad to alright then back to bad again. He underwent a series of delicate operations. The latest of which came two months ago when he was rushed to the Philippine Heart Center (PHC).

Now, his frail body is fighting as his stay at the PHC is nearing to end. But the bills are mounting as his family is racing against time to find doctors who can save him. The financial burden is only part of the family’s predicament. Many relatives and friends have remained steadfast to help. Among them is Rea Rodriguez and her coworkers at Yamang Bukid Healthy Products Inc. (YBHPI), maker of wellness product Yamang Bukid Turmeric 10-in-1 Tea.

During an impromptu lunchtime fund raiser, Rodriguez and her colleagues had raised about P35,000 which they gave to the baby’s mother, Pollyn.
But the amount is still paltry compared to the expected costs as Baby Ali again goes under the knife. The family and all those who love Baby Ali are knocking hearts for help and prayers.

They are not giving up on Baby Ali. Ever.

For those who want to help, you may contact Ms. Pollyn Pagcaliwangan on Facebook.

Cash deposits may be made to this account:

POLICARPIO M. PAGCALIWANGAN Landbank of the Philippines Account number: SA 3636-0115-75

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