Kids, hundreds others run for ailing infant

Published: September 15, 2019 07:22pm | PHILIPPINES


More than 200 runners from all walks of life joined the first-ever run for a cause organized by turmeric beverage-maker Yamang Bukid Healthy Products Inc. (YBHPI) in Baguio City.

Donning orange and green shirts, at least 274 runners took off from Burnham Park and sprinted in three to five-kilometer categories in designated routes around downtown Baguio amid an overcast sky and chilly Saturday morning for the Run for Life charity event.

The fun run was aimed at generating financial support for Ariel Fesetan Jr., a one-year old boy from Baguio who has been suffering from biliary atresia, a congenital liver disease that needs surgical treatment abroad for him to live normally.

(Photos by Redentor Glen and Brother George)

It was a fun-filled event, with a zumba exercise at past 5 a.m. pumping up the joiners. Participants included employees of the Philippines’ number 1 turmeric tea brand, Yamang Bukid Turmeric 10-in-1 Tea, as well as school-based organizations, sports groups and even entire families.

“This is my second run. I’m excited to finish the full three kilometers,” said Jasmine Guadana, an 11-year old student from Baguio Patriotic High School, as she and 14 other students were doing pre-race warmups.

Other participants included Team Cordillera, a sporting group based in Baguio that had earlier raised funds for baby Ariel.

(Photos by Redentor Glen and Brother George)

Runners also included several children with disabilities (CWDs) as well as entire families.

Among them is the father-and-son tandem of Jenard and Jerald Christopher, both surnamed Cervantes.

(Photos by Redentor Glen and Brother George)

“It was somehow painful in the legs but fun. I would love to run again,” said nine-year old Jerald Christopher.

His 52-year old father, Jenard, is an athletic man who often brings along his family to events like Saturday’s.

“We are fond of joining fun runs to stay fit,” said the elder Cervantes, adding his wife was not able to take part due to health reasons.

He said he also felt happy the registration fees he and his son paid would go a long way to help save an infant’s life.

Ariel Fesetan Sr. said he and his wife Mary Grace were grateful to the organizers and participants of Saturday’s fun run.

The family needs about P2.5 million to shoulder Ariel Junior’s operation, which is clinically-ideal to be done in an hospital in India.

“I’m thankful to Yamang Bukid and to those who joined for helping my son. Whatever amount we will get will come a long way to help save my child,” said the 29-year old Ariel Senior, a construction worker. His wife, also 29, is a public high school teacher. The charity event coincides with YBHPI’s sixth anniversary.

(JL)


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